The governess and the freedom of miles

Douglas presents to the narrator a first-person account by a now dead governess of the strange events of her first job.

The governess and the freedom of miles

He may mean he wants to be around other boys, or he may be making a coded reference to his homosexuality. James seems to tease us by suggesting that whatever we see in this story reveals more about us and our preoccupations than it does about the story itself. Miles gains a psychological advantage over the governess when he tells her he will convince his uncle to come down and discuss his schooling, and the governess is too overcome with agitation at hearing this to go to church.

Thus far, she has sublimated her feelings for her employer, pouring them into her effort to rescue the children and to shield the employer from any trouble. At the end of Chapter XIII, she even asserts that his complete silence is intended to flatter and pay tribute to her.

The idea of confronting the employer face to face has become quite alarming for her, and her experiences after she leaves the children at the church door suggest that she feels guilty about her desires. The best evidence for her feelings of guilt is when she begins to identify herself with Miss Jessel, whom she now sees as the most odious woman possible because Miss Jessel had had a sexual affair.

First, she is upset when she realizes she has collapsed on the bottom step of the staircase exactly as Miss Jessel had sat earlier.

Finally, she decides that Miss Jessel is asserting that she has just as much right to be there as the governess. Miss Jessel apparently represents something that the governess simultaneously identifies with, desires, and loathes.The royal governess was living in an almost exclusively female world, shrouded and secretive.

Therapy for the Governess; A Psychoanalytic View of her Sickness and Crime

As a woman, she was forbidden from driving, being alone with a man, drinking alcohol or leaving the. The governess escapes from Miles and her expected sexual actions, while the woman in "The Yellow Wallpaper" escapes her dominating husband. By straying from their expected functions as females, each reaches the ultimate goal: freedom.

By the end of the story, Heilman states that the governess "emphasizes Mile's freedom and sorrowfully gives up 'the fiction that I had anything more to teach him.'" He suggests that this is because Miles has eaten from the tree of knowledge. Apr 22,  · Moreover, Elizabeth Weigle, a second-year graduate student at the Manhattan School, gave an impressive performance as the Governess.

Her . Miles never speaks for himself on the matter, but through the governess’s eyes her condemnation of Quint’s sexuality as a result of the repression of her own sexual drive results in seeing Miles as only a victim in need of “salvation”. The governess escapes from Miles and her expected sexual actions, while the woman in "The Yellow Wallpaper" escapes her dominating husband.

By straying from their expected functions as females, each reaches the ultimate goal: freedom.

The governess and the freedom of miles
SparkNotes: The Turn of the Screw: Chapters XIV, XV, XVI, and XVII