Reflections of the fall of the

The Institute has therefore adopted a pedagogical approach that concerns itself exclusively with ways in which individuals can be helped to increase their capacity to serve. This capacity, while intimately connected with spirituality, operates in relation to it in ways that need not be defined precisely. It suffices to understand that the field of service represents the environment within which spirituality can be cultivated.

Reflections of the fall of the

People are thinking more like their leaders and our leaders are thinking more like the people. It looks like unity but it has its dangers. While this might appear as democracy at work, I submit that what results from this Cult of Trust could be a highly anti-democratic situation.

In every democratic country the elected officials eventually reflect the populace. They are, in a single person, the condensed symbol of what the masses are supposedly thinking. This political lock-step seems to be strength but in actuality it is too often no more than a fear of being disloyal.

Hesitation, doubt, distrust, dissent and disloyalty have become synonyms Reflections of the fall of the the current American patois. In the name of unity democracy finds itself submerged beneath the philosophy of "my country right or wrong".

The Germans and the Russians wanted to be good, loyal citizens. There, too, it was, "my country right or wrong, "and the result was mass destruction, starvation and death. What their leaders asked for was complete trust. What they meant was that the people should abjure all critical ability and passively agree to whatever the leaders decided.

Even now in the Soviet Union the leaders are asking for complete trust based on their distrust of past leaders. At a time when the functions of democracy are enhanced we seem less inclined to use them lest we be accused of shattering American unity.

The cult of trust is supplanting independent thought, and we are moving towards a democracy by indirection wherein the people's will is polled rather than meaningfully voted. The poll is king and when it indicates that the time is ripe for a vote, democracy becomes official.

We can see objectively what trust did in other countries, particularly Iraq, where they are en route to having their country demolished. What we can't see so easily is our own devotion to trust. Don't trust trust too much.

Review of "Beyond Belief"

Government by survey is becoming the mode, and judging by a recent survey we are all in trouble. Though Americans are reluctant about a ground war in Iraq they are nevertheless willing to go along with the judgment of our leaders. In a recent poll the people agreed with the generals that they shouldn't be given too much information.

When information lacks, trust makes its entry. And now the news seems to be highly managed by a series of press briefings. The cult of trust seems to grow in inverse proportion to the amount of information received. The less information the government offers, the more we need, obviously, to rely on trust.

We are told that some information must be withheld because of the "national interest. A situation is occurring wherein those who want to know more, who hesitate or question, who are restless because we are not given the facts, are considered out of line and castigated for giving "aid and comfort to the enemy.

The problem is that preservation of democracy becomes secondary to the preservation of a united face before the world. This is not necessarily a conscious plot by secret conspirators but the culmination of a situation in which the people and leaders unconsciously manipulate each other to preserve a mystical strength.

We are caught in the "consensus bag" and no one seems free to inject new ideas or new moves.

Reflections of the fall of the

The danger is that America's historic dialogue may be coming to an end - replaced by an executive monologue orchestrating a consensus and sowing suspicions against those out of tune with the jingoistic melody.

It was an analysis of thirty related research studies from which a composite of the super-patriot was drawn. It presented a hypothetical man, found on the far right, who stresses violence as a solution to complex problems and who emphasizes power in both interpersonal and international relations.

The portrait was thus summarized: No matter how much protection he has, he can never have enough to quell his inner insecurity. He sees the world in terms of black and white and distrusts his fellow man.Reflections, Reunions, Articles, and other Items of Interest's..

Here below, is a listing of events that we attended, related articles and other memrollbia from the group on the subject of our tour in RVN. I tell myself: Speak in tones that aren't patronizing and sorrowful or as if you're irrevocably broken.

Then coach yourself away from the fear of not being able to help. Decadence, Rome and Romania, the Emperors Who Weren't, and Other Reflections on Roman History What do you think of the state of Romania?

Does it stand as from the beginning, or has it been diminished? Doctrina Jacobi nuper baptizati. These educational and pastoral resources— including prayers, activities, videos, and Church teaching— can help communities to support refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and around the world in a .

Sep 18,  · At a time when the functions of democracy are enhanced we seem less inclined to use them lest we be accused of shattering American unity. The cult of trust is supplanting independent thought, and we are moving towards a democracy by indirection wherein the people's will is polled rather than meaningfully voted.

"The center is housed in a beautiful facility that exudes serenity and calm. Reflections extends and enhances the yoga experience in every class and workshop.

Reflections for Sunday, July 15, 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time | Catholic Lane