After the way called heresy book

And, even, also, namely.

After the way called heresy book

Apr 24, Kerry Campbell rated it really liked it I must confess that I found this book difficult to read, but at the same time I am willing to concede that this may quite rightly be more of a reflection on me than the book.

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This book I can say gives the impression it is very thorough and even-handed in its historical analysis of heresy. Another impression this book gives is that the Christian community can be thankful that heresies and their continued occurrence down the ages are not only useful but essential, in that they provide the necessar I must confess that I found this book difficult to read, but at the same time I am willing to concede that this may quite rightly be more of a reflection on me than the book.

Another impression this book gives is that the Christian community can be thankful that heresies and their continued occurrence down the ages are not only useful but essential, in that they provide the necessary backdrop for asking the essential question: Just what does constitute authentic Christianity?

In this we see the truth in the words of Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians: Lewis said, one cannot call a line crooked without some idea of a straight line.

And it is the impetus of the crooked in our midst that inspires us to better express what is straight. While for some, this may represent a disappointment in the book- in that little discussion takes place as to what authentic Christianity is, the book, true to its subject, is all about the history of ideas that have claimed to be authentic Christianity and have been found wanting.

An important distinction made in this work is that Christianity began with few Creedal statements and a very basic set of beliefs about Christ. Lewis made another discerning comment- that good philosophy must exist if for no other reason than to answer bad philosophy- and this truth also applies to theology.

The growth in the creedal affirmations and more methodical, systematic theology of orthodox Christianity grew out of the need to answer bad theology. So in a sense, as more and more subtle but on the whole sincere attempts to better articulate what was true about Christ in order to fit into the presuppositions of other worldviews, other thinkers joined the fray to protect the purity of the Gospel.

Although perhaps not a direct aim of the book, what comes abundantly clear to me, is that what is utterly vital if Christianity is to continue to be consistent with its plus years of its history; is that eternal vigilance is the price of Christian liberty, and therefore the dialogue, the debate and the discussion must continue apace and this at least, is in the Spirit of Christ.

McGrath does an admirable job of showing how some of these attempts to redefine Christianity were motivated by a perceived need to genuinely make Christianity more palatable in terms of the contemporary thinking and culture of the time or the place in which they occurred.

They were rebutted as the perception arose that these views tended to erode or destroy Christianity. He examines the psychology of heresy. He rightly examines the tension that exists between authority and the role of conscience and how this played out historically in the reformation.

He also does a good job of making clear that when Christianity became a political force that heresy also was politicized. Heresy ceased -in a sense- to represent heterodox views but became merely the loser in a battle for power.

This is an important distinction for today also, and a cogent reminder that there is much and warranted suspicion in today's context of post-modernism that "orthodoxy" is not connected necessarily to truth at all but exists merely as a ploy for power over others.

As one would expect the lessons from history will continue to have a bearing on the direction that Christianity takes in the future. For that reason alone this is a valuable contribution to Christian thought.

But it is this writers view that truth by nature is objective and universal and therefore timeless- what changes is the culture and we need innovation in the sense of re-applying timeless truth to contemporary thought.

I think there is inherent danger in the idea in McGrath's comment p. The mind of the church is not necessarily the mind of Christ.

If that is the sense he intends then well and good, however When Christ said "it is finished" he incorporated and this is a good word the sense of a finished and complete gospel.

There is a danger as Ravi Zacharias, speaking of the "emergent church", recently spelled out: After years of Christian thought and suddenly we didn't know what Christ was on about! Pfwd McGrath proposes that the newly formed movement now known as Protestantism, while struggling with such heresies as anti-Trinitarianism, "was able to deal with such heterodox trends by an appeal to the consensus of faith of the church as set out in the councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon.

Could these be described as heretical if they were found unacceptable?

After the way called heresy book

Pelagianism and Semi-pelagianism had indeed already been dealt with and seen to be heretical in earlier councils and the new controversy was simply another angle on that.

In that way Protestantism could have fallen back on the authority of the earlier councils but by extension relate it to the new-ish but related controversy. The question of predestination by God or whether-quote- "human beings were, if only to a limited extent, implicated in their own election Of course it is true that "human beings were To the extent then, of making a conscious decision, there is no doubt humanity is implicated in their own salvation and election.

I don't know any Calvinists that would deny this. But I assume this is also quite clear to McGrath which is all the more reason why I wonder why he expressed it in this way. The real question is: And that is where I most strongly object to the latter half of that statement where he concludes that either view: Cohere- yes but equally- no.If this is heresy, I confess with Paul in Acts ‘following the way which is called heresy, I worship the God of my fathers, believing all things that are written in the law and the prophets’; and, I add, whatever is written in the New Testament as well.

After the Way Called Heresy Book Review Anthony Gonzales Apostolic School of Theology After the Way Called Heresy Book Review Throughout the line of church history, Oneness doctrine has suffered persecution, Condemnation, and expulsion.

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(14) After the way which they call heresyBetter, which they call a sect. The Greek noun is the same as in Acts , and ought, therefore, to be translated by the same English word.

After the way called heresy book

As it is, the reader does not see that the "way" had been called a heresy. Download after the way called heresy or read after the way called heresy online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get after the way called heresy book now.

This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. Dec 12,  · After the Way Called Heresy Book Review Throughout the line of church history, Oneness doctrine has suffered persecution, Condemnation, and expulsion. Many believe that the dogma of the Trinity has been the True doctrine of the early church, but the truth is that since the birth of the church which in the Book of Acts.

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